“Courageous Conner” Tackles the Dairy and Veal Industries Through the Pages of a Children’s Book

courageousconnercover18lo-dropAuthor Heather Leughmyer has added another book to her Kindness to Animals series—this one tackling the not-so-hidden dirty secrets of the dairy and veal industries—and does it all through the pages of a rhyming children’s book.

In the story, Courageous Conner is torn from his mother and faces two challenges: can he be brave enough to find his way back to her side, and will they, together, escape the cruel conditions they find themselves in?

Unwanted calves from the dairy industry are routinely ripped from loving mothers, their flesh turned into the meal of an unthinking or uncaring consumer.

Heather, a long time vegan activist, excels at creating rhyming children’s stories, and is using her gift to create a series advocating for Kindness to Animals. Courageous Conner is the third book in the series, which so far features Adopting Adele and Brave Benny, too. Heather plans to work her way through the alphabet, creating children’s books featuring the many animals who need a little kindness in today’s society.

Courageous Conner is perfect for ages 6 and up, and excellent for both humane education and library and family story time. The book is currently available in both paperback and kindle, and coming soon in audio.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle

Book Sample:

Little Conner was born on the 3rd day of June, to a proud mama cow, one warm afternoon. His mom gently cleaned him, as a good mother would, then he wiggled and wobbled, until finally he stood.

She gave him soft kisses on his velvety head, then faintly he mooed; Conner now needed fed. He found mama’s milk; it was pleasingly sweet. When his tummy was full, he took a nap at her feet.

But his dreams were cut short by the cries of another; someone was taking a calf from his mother! Conner stayed silent as he cowered in fear; he looked up at his mom as the human drew near…

About the Author:

Heather Leughmyer graduated from Indiana-Purdue University with a B.A. in English Writing and Linguistics. She is a dedicated vegan, animal rights activist and animal rescuer.

Writing has been a passion of hers for as long as she has advocated for animals. By telling their stories and illustrating their pain she hopes to touch a few hearts and change a few minds with her words.

Heather is the author of If Your Tears Were Human, Adopting Adele, Brave Benny, Courageous Conner, and co-editor of Rescue Smiles. She lives in Columbia City, Indiana, with her husband, daughter and several animal companions.

About the Illustrator:

Our whimsical artist, April Pedersen, is a freelancer based in Reno, Nevada. She is partial to frogs, geocaching, science fiction, video poker, and chess.

April is the illustrator of Adopting Adele, Brave Benny, Bravo’s Freedom, Happy Dog Coloring Book, and Courageous Conner.

 

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Excerpt from Award-Winning “Rescue Smiles” Shows Storytelling at its Finest

rescuesmilescoverlodropOur 2017 release Rescue Smiles: Favorite Animal Stories of Love and Liberation earned a best book distinction in the Human/Animal Bond category of the Dog Writers’ Association of America Annual Awards. The book features 15 stories offering a look into the emotional lives of rescuers and the living beings they hold dear.

In grititude for this honor, we’d like to share with you an excerpt from one of our featured authors, Laura Koerber, and her delightful tale of an unusual bond in “The Bandit and the Engineer.”

The Bandit and the Engineer: Alice

by Laura Koerber

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The little dog crouched beneath the tangle of blackberries and salal and waited. The man banged the front door open, strode across the lawn, and flung himself into his SUV. The brake lights flashed, the engine hummed, and the car rolled backward into the street where it reoriented itself and vanished in a puff of exhaust.

She wrinkled her nose: bad smell. Then she waited. The door opened and a woman hurtled out. She had her arms full of stuff, which she dumped on the hood of her car while she fished for her keys. Then she looked over toward the little dog under the rhody.

They made eye contact. The little dog tensed, but this eye contact was part of the morning routine. Then the woman flung her stuff into the car, slid in, and blasted off in a swirl of noise and exhaust fumes.

The two people left at the same time every weekday morning. The little dog knew their routine because she had been watching them for months. She didn’t know the names of the days of the week, but she knew the pattern of days when they departed early in the morning and days when they didn’t.

As soon as the woman’s car was out of sight, the little dog emerged from the brush, scurried across the street, and dived into the safety of the forsythia hedge. She burrowed through the side yard shrubbery and popped out into the backyard where she was greeted by the moist smell of food. In one bound she was up on the deck and had her nose in the bowl.

The food was there every morning, and if she was quick, she got to eat it all. If she wasn’t quick, the cat got it first. Sometimes the crows got it. The crows she could chase off, but the cat was downright mean. She gobbled and snuffled with one eye out for the ferocious beast; but luckily, there was no cat today.

She stepped back from the bowl, licking her lips. What else could she find on the deck?
Water—there was always water in the bowl. The cat didn’t drink much, and didn’t mind sharing. The little dog was thirsty so she drank deeply. Then she had a quick look around.

Some bags of something that smelled nasty (fertilizer), a large potted plant that the cat had peed on, the smell of the human and cat on the doormat, and the scent of human on a pair of shoes. She sniffed carefully. She liked the warm human smell. She picked one shoe up. The fabric was soft in her mouth (canvas deck shoe). It had a sharp taste, very human (sweat).

She ran with the shoe in her mouth around the house, across the street, and into her private passageway through the berry canes and salal of the undeveloped lots. She felt safe in the comforting embrace of the forest. Her pace slowed. She had to hold her head up high to keep the shoe from snagging on the ferns and forest litter. She stopped by a fallen tree. The roots, ripped out of the ground, formed an immense fan shape, and were overgrown with moss and ferns. At the bottom of the fan in the dirt was a hollow which she had enlarged and deepened. She dropped the shoe into the hollow.

A fat drop of rain struck her one upraised ear. She heard the singing of the rain in the treetops; then she felt a wet sting on her nose. She wriggled down into her burrow.

It took awhile for her to rearrange the shoes to her satisfaction…

Wonder what happens to Alice and how she meets up with the Engineer? Continue your delight in Rescue Smiles, available in both paperback, kindle, and audiobook at these links:

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook

 

Who Chains You Publishing Supports Humane Education in its Quest to Promote Kindness to Animals for Today’s Youth

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Humane Education is one of the most important tools we have to engender a sense of kindness in future generations. By breaking the chain of cruelty to animals through direct communication with youth in schools, we create a more caring society, for humans as well as animals. Our wholesale program is perfect to assist Humane Educators in teaching our youth about animal issues in society.

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We offer wholesale pricing of only $6.50 per book (with FREE Shipping—U.S. ONLY, please contact us for shipping to other countries), mix and match, to humane educators—and every book is available for the program. There is a 10 book minimum order for this program, after that the sky’s the limit!

Even better, for humane educators who need books in higher quantities, orders of 50+ books are only $6.00 each, a savings of over 50% off retail.

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Are you a humane educator in need of books? Then look no further! If you have questions or special needs, or would like to ask about other wholesale opportunities, email us at info@whochainsyou.com for more information.

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Interested in checking out all our available books? Please use the order form on our site to check availability and place your order.

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Our books are already in use in classrooms and libraries by teachers nationwide, like Sonya Wilson, pictured left.

Humane Educator Susan Hergert took books from Who Chains You to her first school visit. She writes in her blog: “When it was all over, I gave the students some books to keep there. They were thrilled with the selections and began to immediately read them! I truly wished I had brought more…a book for each child, perhaps. As I left, I told Nancy that I will bring more in the future.”

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Calling all Humane Educators:

Let us know what other topics or animal issues you are interested in sharing with students, and the age ranges you’d like the books to fit. We’d be happy to get our authors brainstorming book ideas for your topic of interest. Leave us a comment, below, with your suggestions. Thank you for caring about the kids and the animals!