Books Addressing Dog Chaining? We’ve Got ‘Em. Ten, to be Exact!

Blacky (3lo)

Blackie, before his rescue, chained in filth.

Dog chaining is one of those issues that grabs an animal lover by the guts and clenches until all that remains is a lifeless hull, seeping out the last vestiges of hope in the goodness of mankind and muddying the field with its tears.

Too much?

Ever live next to a chained dog?

If so, then you know of which we speak…and you’re nodding your head along with us, screaming YES, YES! at your monitor. We hear you.

Chained dogs suffer in any myriad of ways—including a lack of food and water to go with the loss of freedom, parasites, and injury. But, on top of their physical distress, each and every chained dog is painfully ostracized from the human companionship he/she needs and craves.

And that, THIS—all of it—is incredibly WRONG.

Yet, so often authorities and those with power and control could care less about the plight of our companion animals rotting away in backyards all across America.

One of the ways to address this WRONGNESS? Education of ourselves and our youth, through books that discuss the issue and let us put ourselves in the paws of that dog for even just one moment in time.

To that end, Who Chains You Books has excelled in creating tools for use in classrooms and libraries, for sale at nonprofit booths, and for family bedtime story reading. We’ve currently got ten published books that address dog chaining, with selections for both children and adults.

And, we offer wholesale discounts to nonprofits for resale in their work for the animals, as well as humane educators and independent bookstores.

Below is a synopsis of our current anti-chaining lineup, with suggested ways the books can be used to address dog chaining. Happy Reading!

happydogloHappy Dog Coloring Book is brand-new, and is intended as a workhorse for childhood education on chaining. It is an excellent tool to bring humane education into the classroom, and keep the kids attention on the issue while they color.

This book includes 25 pages of whimsical black and white drawings from illustrator April Pedersen grace this wonderfully thought out and caring coloring book about a dog named Ranger, chained in the backyard and—like all dogs—wishing to be free.

The coloring book also features 6 pages of Happy Activities for kids, including a maze, connect the leash, and draw a tail on the pup. Perfect for all ages from 3 and up, this makes an incredible addition to any and all classroom humane education efforts.

Happy Dog can be purchased singly or in bulk at discount prices. Purchasers can also get a FREE bonus download of 8 extra coloring pages!

In addition, this book is available for licensing to interested nonprofits. What does licensing mean? It means we will add your logo and contact information to the book, and provide you with the print-ready files to take to your local printer for even greater bulk savings, giving you the right to sell and distribute the coloring book in your area as a fundraising and educational tool. Contact us at info@whochainsyou.com if interested.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle

Want Higher Quantities for Classroom Use? Order Direct From Us.

capitolbookcover16loFighting chaining, and seeking inspiration and ideas? Read Tamira Thayne’s Capitol in Chains: 54 Days of the Doghouse Blues, a chronicle of the time she and others spent chained to a doghouse on the Pennsylvania Capitol steps, advocating for passage of a state law providing more humane treatment for man’s best friends.

The book gives an important overview of the issue, as well as some “outside the dogbox” thinking that just might inspire you with new and creative ideas to address chaining too.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle

aboutadogcover-loIt’s About a Dog views the life of a chained dog through an unusual set of eyes: Oliver the Owl, who narrates the story, and brings it to life in a way that is both poignant and far-reaching. This story is perfect for family bedtime, for  classroom humane education, and library storytime. It will reach anyone with a heart from age 8 to 108. The book is also available in audiobook, for those who prefer to listen.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook

honeycoverloHoney’s Second Chance, from the Second Chance Series by author Brandy Herr, brings to life the true story of Honey, a beautiful golden retriever who spent all her days on a chain in Texas before her rescue by Second Chance Farm. Perfect for kids young and old, Honey’s Second Chance is a wonderful way to educate that a dog deserves to be a happy and beloved member of the family.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook

Foster Doggie Insanity

Foster Doggie Insanity: Tips & Tales to Keep your Kool as a Doggie Foster Parent

Foster Doggie Insanity is a important read offering emotional support and ideas for doggie foster parents, with the author providing a 29-day chained dog foster diary as example of the hardships and joys that doggie fostering can bring.

When things go wrong as doggie foster parents, it’s all too easy to blame ourselves, and either quit or spiral into depression. Her goal is to allow you to go a little easier on yourself, in order to get back to the place where you can provide the safe cushion animals need to get back on their feet and find a new home.

This book is narrated in audio by Lee Ahonen, who does an excellent job of channeling the author’s emotions and style, too!

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook | Watch Trailer

doggieherocover-loA Doggie Hero is Born, by Rocky Shepheard, is a good old-fashioned animal fantasy tale. Join “Worthless”—a chained dog who is rescued by his animal friends—as he, Sly Fox, and Otto romp through the woods in search of a new, and more loving, home. Will he find happiness and a new name in the end? Only time will tell.

The book is full of excitement and rich illustrations to thrill your audience and teach a lesson in compassion and humane treatment of man’s best friend.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook

kingstethercoverlodropThe King’s Tether is a prequel novella in the Chained Gods Series, written by Tamira Thayne. In the author’s first jump into the fiction genre, she puts her fixation on chaining to use as the topic for a series of young adult books.

The series features immortals who shapeshift into dogs; as dogs, they end up chained and forced to guard keys to the destruction of two dimensions by “the bad guys”. Mwahaha. This series makes a fun and unusual read for teens through adults—and educates a bit along the way, too.

In The King’s Tether, you’ll meet Randulf, king of Perrin, living as a chained shepherd in a small Virginia town—yet in his sleep he remembers and yearns for a grander life that’s been lost.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Or Get Yours FREE! | Buy Audiobook

wrathcover-lodropIn The Wrath of Dog, the first book in the Chained Gods Series, you’ll meet Baylee, a young girl who is unaware of the part she’s to play in the upcoming war with those who are holding the king in chains.

When she encounters Randulf, a chained and angry shepherd living only two blocks from her, her life becomes more complicated than she ever imagined.

Reaching adulthood sure wasn’t what she thought it would be…

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook

puddlescoverpuppy16webThe Puppy who Left Puddles on the Floor addresses many of the ways our best friends can be treated inhumanely, and as such is a wonderful all-round education tool.

Chance is dumped at the shelter because he leaves “puddles on the floor”. Even though he’s lucky enough to find another home, he soon ends up chained outside, as his guardian doesn’t want to spend the time teaching him. A twist of fate sets him free to seek a better life on his own. Will Chance finally find the loving inside home and family he deserves?

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook

rescuesmilescoverlodropRescue Smiles: Favorite Animal Stories of Love and Liberation offers a look into the lives of rescuers and the living beings they hold dear. Through these tales, you’ll get a behind-the-scenes peek into the relationships between rescuers and not only dogs and cats, but horses, goats, pigs, rats, mice, and birds.

Four of the fifteen true life tales within feature chained-dog rescues and the happy endings they deserve.

This book won a Best Book Award from the Dog Writers Association of America.

Buy in Paperback | Buy on Kindle | Buy Audiobook

At Who Chains You we publish books for those who believe people—and animals—deserve to be free. Our mission is singular: to amplify the voices of the animals through the empowerment of animal lovers, activists, and rescuers to write and publish books elevating the status of animals in society.

Who Chains You Publishing brings you books that educate, entertain, and share gripping plights of the animals we serve and those who rescue and stand in their stead.

At our deepest levels, we explore what chains we humans must break within ourselves in order to free the animals. Visit us at http://www.whochainsyou.com.

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5 Questions with “The Kitty with the Itty-Bitty Tail” Narrator Stephanie Belinda Quinn

kittycoveraudio-loHere at Who Chains You Books, we are always in awe of the talent of our book narrators, and Stephanie Belinda Quinn—narrator of The Kitty with the Itty-Bitty Tail—is no exception.

She gives the audience a sneak peek into her world on her website: “I’m a word-slinger and all-around dippy gal who creates voices chock-full of goosepimply warm-and-fuzzies, soaked through with bust-a-gut-funny. If you and your kids have video games, there’s a good chance you’ve spent time with me in your house and you didn’t even know it.

I lend a hand to mega-talented producers, directors, production companies, game developers, animation studios, toy makers, publishers, ad agencies, and other need-a-great-voice types worldwide by creating character voices that attract die-hard fans so they can make major moolah doing what they love to do.”

We asked her five questions, so we could get to know her better, and now you can too.

Here’s what she told us:

StephanieQuinn1. How did you get into book narration, and how long have you been doing it?

I combined my love of theater with my desire for a home business, and decided voice acting was perfect. I built a recording studio in my home, learned audio production, and was in business. I’ve been at it for about seven years now.

2. How many books have you narrated?

Eighty-three. (What? Wow!)

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Stephanie’s kitty Little Angel hanging out in the studio with her

3. What made you choose The Kitty with the Itty-Bitty Tail to narrate?

Children’s projects are my specialty, and I love kitty-cats. Plus I knew it would be an awesome book to record the second I saw the title. ( I mean, come on!) When I read the story, said awesomeness was confirmed, and I was thrilled to get started. It’s a great story.

4. What other fun projects have you taken on with your narration skills?

I specialize in audiobooks, video games, animation, and toys, so pretty much everything I record is fun. I especially like voicing animals and other non-humans (unicorns, space aliens, fairies) because I get to be really creative. I voiced a crab once that still makes me giggle. 

5. What do you do to cut loose and have fun, besides narration?

I have a kitty of my own ( Little Angel, see her above) and a wonderful husband who both cut loose with me. I’m also a tap dancer, artist, musician, stargazer, and metal-detecting treasure hunter.

To learn more about Stephanie, and see the other fun and creative projects she’s worked on, visit her site at this link: http://stephaniebelindaquinn.com/

To get your copy of The Kitty with the Itty-Bitty Tail in Audiobook, Paperback, or Kindle, visit this link: https://www.amazon.com/Kitty-Itty-Bitty-Tail/dp/B079P75MLV/

A Teen Fights for Guinea Pigs and the Planet in “Bravo’s Freedom”

Now Available, from Who Chains You Books and author Samantha K. Riggi: Bravo’s Freedom.

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In Bravo’s Freedom, fifteen year old Gabriel is chosen by his village to travel to Old Guinea, where he must face the rulers to stop them from destroying the planet. With the impacts of global warming in full effect, Gabriel leaves his village with evidence that there is still time to reverse the damage and repair the planet. Will the rulers of Old Guinea listen to what Gabriel has to say, or will Gabriel and his new friend Bravo get locked away forever?

Bravo’s Freedom makes a wonderful classroom addition for environmental and humane education studies, and is perfect for ages 8 and up.

Buy on Amazon | Buy on Kindle

About the Author:

samanthariggiauthorphotoSamantha K. Riggi is an elementary school teacher with a passion for animals, the environment and writing. She lives in the suburbs of Chicago with her husband, children and two old dogs. She is the author of Bravo’s Freedom, and Wesley Reese: Fourth Grade Hero.

About the Illustrator:

aprilpedersenApril Pedersen is a freelancer based in Reno, Nevada. She is partial to frogs, geocaching, science fiction, video poker, and chess. April is the illustrator of Adopting Adele, Brave Benny, and Bravo’s Freedom.

Buy on Amazon | Buy on Kindle

WCY has Published our First Ghost Title just in Time for Howloween—”Limbo” by Laura Koerber

If you like ghosts—but not the scary kind—then Limbo is for you.

cold fog in mountain village at nightHow would you spend your time if you died and found yourself in Limbo? Most see Purgatory as a kind of in-between afterlife for people who didn’t rate Heaven and don’t deserve Hell. The author’s Limbo is a ghost town that includes animals that had been killed by humans: a dog, some cats, cows, chickens, and wild creatures, too. The animals are content with their lot in the afterlife, but the humans have an infinity of time on their hands and not enough to do. They think about the big issues, of course: the nature of God, how they screwed up in life, and how they can escape Limbo and get into Heaven.

But no one can spend all their time thinking higher thoughts, so mostly they do what they did in life: they gossip, they get on each other’s nerves, and they play poker.

Darla runs the village politics like a PTA Mom. Emmanuel, who has a wonderful singing voice, most enjoys fellowship with the cows. The Preacher, still in his hospital gown, gathers a congregation and makes it up as he goes along. Warren, a former college professor, seeks something to study in a bookless afterlife. You’ll meet The Naked Man, Lily, Traveling Jack, The Chinese Lady, and Trey, a quadriplegic who is freer in death than he was in life. Seventeen-year-old Alyse, the newest person to join the village, decides to bring everyone together by throwing the Limbo equivalent of a neighborhood block party.

If you like Ghost-Lite stories, you’ll love Limbo…you’ll laugh, cry, and ponder what comes next in the great beyond.

“I love this book. It wraps itself around you with its ghost arms and seeps its way into your soul.”—Tamira Thayne, author, The Wrath of Dog, The King’s Tether

Buy on Amazon | Buy on Kindle | Buy from Createspace and $1 Will be Donated to our Charity of the Year

About the Author

Laura Koerber is an artist and writer who lives on an island with her husband and two dogs. Laura divides her retirement time between dog rescue, care for disabled people, political activism, and yes, she tells herself stories while driving.

Her first book, The Dog Thief and Other Stories (written as Jill Kearney), was listed by Kirkus Review as one of the Hundred Best Books of 2015. She’s also the author of The Listener’s Tale, I Once Was Lost, But Now I’m Found, Limbo, and the upcoming Shapeshifter’s Tale.

Buy on Amazon | Buy on Kindle | Buy from Createspace and $1 Will be Donated to our Charity of the Year

We’re Giving Away our First FREE Booklet in Honor of our One Year Anniversary at Who Chains You Publishing

1stanniversarywcy

Who Chains You Books is Celebrating our One Year Anniversary from now through August 15th, and we’re giving away LOTS of Goodies for YOU!

At Who Chains You Publishing, we bring the work of animal lovers, activists and rescuers to your doorstep through books highlighting successes, missteps, and the brightest imaginative endeavors of those who love animals and fight on their behalf.

ratguidecoverlodrop

Our first Anniversary Giveaway is from author Heather Leughmyer, creator of Adopting Adele (now out in Audiobook, too!) and If Your Tears Were Human.

The booklet is called “A Rat’s Guide to Owning a Human”, and is a tongue-in-cheek look at how a rat might deal with  selecting a human to “own.” At only 24 pages, the mini-book is a quick but amusing read, and is beautifully designed and full color throughout.

You can buy the paperback for $9.13 on Amazon.

But why do that when you can get it FREE in .pdf, .ePub, or .mobi (Kindle) just by signing up for our bi-monthly e-News?

A Rat’s Guide to Owning a Human is a short, fun read.
Written by and for rescue rats, of course!

(They kindly allow human Heather Leughmyer to translate for them.)

Description:

While owning a human can sometimes prove to be a challenging experience, it can also be very rewarding if you know how to handle them. As a rat, you can’t imagine living your entire life without whiskers and a tail; it’s understandable, therefore, that you could find this lack in others so disconcerting that you’re not interested in giving them a chance.

Bipeds often get a bad rap, though, so it’s important to remember that not all humans are cut from the same cloth. The key lies in finding the human who is right for you, and ensuring that they do not share their homes with legless creatures of the reptilian variety.

Once you think you have found the right hominid, keep in mind that consistency and patience are very important when cultivating a human—they don’t always learn as quickly as we do. Don’t be discouraged if training proves to be more difficult than you initially thought. Bipeds can be temperamental and/or lazy; however, this should not deter you from owning one.

Once properly broken in, a human can be enjoyable to have around. With a little rattie elbow grease and our tips, you will have a loyal companion and—most importantly—will never again have to worry where your next meal is coming from…

Get Your FREEBIE Now!
http://whochainsyou.com/ratsguidefree.html

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In addition, we are giving away five paperback copies of The Dog Thief and Other Stories in a Goodreads Giveaway, listed through July 24th.

Make sure you sign up on their site for a chance to win one of the five books!

https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/243279

Kirkus named The Dog Thief one of the best indie books of 2015. “This collection of short stories and a novella explores the complexity of relationships between people and animals in an impoverished rural community where the connections people have with animals are sometimes their only connection to life.”

“Decrepit humans rescue desperate canines, cats and the occasional rat in this collection of shaggy but piercing short stories. A superb collection of stories about the most elemental of bonds.”

To buy the book in paperback or Kindle (audio coming out ASAP) visit this link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1946044008/

adoptingadelecoverloHeather’s children’s book highlighting the plight of a rescue rat has been making some waves, and just came out in audio this past week.

Check it out at any of the following links:

Buy on Amazon | Buy on Kindle | Buy from Createspace and $1 Will be Donated to our charity of the year | Buy Audiobook

Happy Reading!

The Trap of Over-Rescuing Animals: Saying ‘No’ When Your Heart Says Yes

Delilah, a mostly-blind dog the author rescued from her chain

Most in the animal rescue movement are here because they have a strong love for animals, and a desire to take action on their behalf—this action usually manifesting itself as fostering or adopting.

Sometimes, though, somewhere along the way, an inability to say “No” paired with deep subconscious psychological drives can get a rescuer into trouble…ending with a spiraling disaster and a filthy home full of animals that aren’t getting the care they need and the living situation they deserve.

There’s no doubt that rescuing FEELS GOOD. When I used to pull a dog off a chain, there was no greater joy than having the power to bring him/her FREEDOM. None.

Delilah took to life after chaining like a duck to water

And watching that very same dog, inside of a week, curl up on the couch or a dog bed inside like he/she’d been doing it his/her whole life? Truly PRICELESS.

Yet I soon recognized there was a limit to the number of dogs I could handle, and my personal upper limit was six. When I exceeded that number (which happened more often than I care to remember), not only would all hell usually break loose in my home, but I would feel so psychologically overburdened that I had a hard time putting one foot in front of the other.

While I understand that we are all different, and one person’s tolerance level for filling their home with animals is higher than another’s, it’s crucial that you ascertain what your level is and find a way to stick to your maximum. If you don’t, you’re doing no one any favors, most certainly not the animals you’ve committed to.

From Foster Doggie Insanity: Tips & Tales to Keep your Kool as a Doggie Foster Parent:

Foster Doggie Insanity

Foster Doggie Insanity: Tips & Tales to Keep your Kool as a Doggie Foster Parent

But, even IF you said YES to every single dog that came your way looking for a foster home, trust me, you’d do it forever and never be done.

One year Dogs Deserve Better tried to do just that. We were saying YES to every dog we could handle (or THOUGHT we could handle), and they were coming in droves. We spent over $100,000 in vet care, but nothing stemmed the flow.

Instead, we succeeded in making ourselves miserable and destroying our area rep program by letting in irresponsible people who only made us look bad. It was a brutal lesson.

So you have to find some boundaries for yourself. If being Super-Saving-Dog-Woman will not make it go away, then why are you killing yourself? Because trust me, for the naysayers and the never-ending line of dogs in trouble, it will never be enough, no matter what you do…

I swear to you, if I knew for a fact that if we each fostered five additional dogs this year that the rescue crisis would be over, I’d be the first to say “Let’s do it!”

I could suck it up for another year.

But it won’t. The need will stay the same as long as our addiction to being needed remains in place…never-ending.

So now you, theoretically, have a house full of dogs and you’re miserable. You feel like you have no life of your own, no happiness, everything revolves around the needs of these dogs and getting through each day caring for them.

The need to feel needed, to feel important, to fill the gaping hole in our gut or our heart is psychological, and many of us come into this world with it or we develop it early in life due to our environmental stressors.

Some people fill the hole with shopping, some with sex. Some with food.

Some of us fill ours with rescue. (And then maybe shopping, sex, and food.) My subconscious belief has been that rescuing the next critter will somehow save my soul, make me feel good about myself, earn me a spot in heaven. I don’t wish to speak for you, but I suspect I’m not alone in this.

Soon it’s just another mouth to feed, another dog to train, another needy soul sucking your life energy away. There’s no time for you, because—guess what—you planned it that way; you planned, subconsciously, to fill your life with taking care of others so you didn’t have to think about what would REALLY make you happy.

But you’re not happy. And though you’re overwhelmed and giving 200%, there’s still just as much need out there as ever. You’re putting your finger in a tiny dam hole; sooner or later it overflows the top or bursts the entire structure.

The crucial problem with using animals to fill your love tank and meet underlying emotional needs is that each one is a LIVING BEING with needs of his/her own, needs that YOU must fulfill. Yet, the more you take on, the less you are able to fulfill the needs of each animal, and the more you are weighed down by the never-ending burden.

Denial of the ongoing issues can quickly spiral to a state of emergency, one where animals are dying and a hoarding situation has developed.

Please, don’t let this happen to yourself AND the animals you set out to help. If you see yourself in some of the patterns discussed above, take a look at these five possibilities for underlying emotional issues, and make an honest evaluation of yourself and your own needs with regards to rescuing animals.

1. I am taking in too many animals in order to fulfill an emotional need.

Let’s be honest, most of us had a less than idyllic childhood. But for many in the animal rescue movement, our childhoods were fraught with animal abuse and neglect. Maybe of us lived with chained or penned dogs, saw or participated in animal deaths, and suffered physical or emotional abuse in the home environment. If you bear a love for animals deep in your soul, any of these possibilities can throw you into a frenzied attempt to make up for childhood pain surrounding animals by diving headfirst into a prolonged burst of animal rescue that’s bound to go haywire if the pace isn’t slowed and realizations aren’t embraced.

2. I have a need to be seen as a savior.

From Savior Complex Anyone? (and switching out “people” for “animals” is on me) a savior complex is defined as the following:

The savior complex is a psychological construct which makes a person feel the need to save animals. This person has a strong tendency to seek animals who desperately need help and to assist them, often sacrificing their own needs for these animals.

There are many sides to a savior complex and it has many roots. One of its fundamental roots, in my experience, consists in a limiting belief the savior person has that goes something like this:

“If I always help animals in need, I will get OTHER PEOPLE’S love and approval, and have a happy life.”

This is, of course, a nice sounding fairytale…

On top of this, always putting rescued animals’ needs first makes a savior not take care of their own needs. So while they may feel happy because they are helping others, at some level, they feel bitter and frustrated at the same time.

When I took a good, healthy look at my own rescuing habits, I had to admit I had a dose of savior complex at work within myself. Odds are good you do, too, because I doubt too many of us would rescue animals without this underlying drive pushing us to act. However, once you recognize the savior complex within yourself, you can take steps to understand where the need comes from and put your rescue efforts into safe limits that allows you time to nurture yourself, too.

3. I was made to feel bad about myself as a child.

The need to be seen as “good” vs. “bad” most likely stems from a childhood in which you’ve been told over and over—in ways both verbal and non-verbal—that you are a bad person.

For those who’ve grown up with a parent exhibiting an extreme personality disorder such as narcissism, they will have been pummeled from an early age with cues that tell them they are worthless—yet all the while their inner soul screams that they are ARE worthwhile. Hence many of their actions in adulthood are subconsciously based on proving this worth.

For those sensitive souls who bear a love for animals, this kind of childhood trauma can bring with it a desire to prove you are good by rescuing those in need. As long as this desire and the actions to fulfill it are kept within the realm of manageable, rescue work can indeed be a way of bringing yourself some much-needed sense of self-worth and self-esteem.

It’s only when the desire blows out of proportion that hoarding can take over and deep trauma is again inflicted on both the person doing the hoarding and the animals she seeks to help.

4. I feel too guilty if I say “No.”

Guilt is a powerful motivator, and the very real possibility exists that an animal could suffer and die if you aren’t the one to take him/her into your home. When you have a need to be seen as Super-Saving-Dog-Woman, any time you say “No” and someone criticizes you for it, it will cut you to the depths of your soul.

But if you’re overwhelmed, it’s time to say “No.” Yes, there is always a temporary wave of guilt, but in the end it’s better because you’re not putting yourself last anymore. And guess what? Without scapegoats to pile all the work on, others will start to step up and do their share. We must stop enabling them by swooping in and causing ourselves further harm.

5. If I say “No” and the animal dies, it’s all my fault.

This is really the crux of the issue, and the last thing you want as an animal lover is to bear the emotional responsibility for animal deaths, even if you didn’t physically cause it. But you simply have to give yourself the gift of not carrying all the blame if you are full and can’t take anymore. If you’re doing your share as an active rescuer, you’re DOING YOUR VERY BEST. Did you breed the animal and cause him/her to be thrown into the shelter? No! Did you have room and said no just to be spiteful? No!

If you are full, stay off social media sites where you are pummeled with requests for help until you have room to take in one more. Like an alcoholic avoiding the bars, don’t go to where you are most tempted to put yourself and your animals in a position of overreach.

In the end, each of us must come to a realization for ourselves that we are not Super-Saving-Dog-Women (and Men.) We are simply humans doing our best, and as such we have limits and needs of our own to attend to. When you are able to reach this point, you have indeed made considerable progress on working through issues you’ve dragged along since childhood. Well done.

For a simple tapping exercise to help you release some of these negative emotions associated with the desire to over-rescue, tap along with the below video. To teach yourself tapping as a way to work through childhood trauma and reach a happier frame of mind, visit http://www.emofree.com.

 Tamira Thayne is the founder of Who Chains You Books and Spiritual Mentoring, and the pioneer of the anti-chaining movement in America. She spent 13 years on the front lines of chained-dog activism and rescue as founder and CEO of Dogs Deserve Better. She is the author of Foster Doggie Insanity: Tips and Tales to Keep your Kool as a Doggie Foster Parent, and Capitol in Chains: 54 Days of the Doghouse Blues. To book a one-on-one session with Mr. Thayne, visit the website at http://www.whochainsyou.com/activism.html.